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lee has chosen to make his first state of the city address here. it sends a message for all student in san francisco. you know that this city's future don't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here and taking the time to join us this morning. you have done so much in this county >> and since this is my first city address i'm hoping you'll cut me some slack if you chose to write about it in the newspapers. to the department heads and consistent leaders and education leaders to all of you who are online and thank you all of you for joining us this morning. and, of course, to my wonderful wife, mother and friend thank you for being here and pitting up with me for all these years >> a year ago i stood before i and score my term of office pledging to
of amsterda. this is the inner city of amsterdam, and the rest of the city are the suburbs. the whole city, there are 2.2 million people, but the real city of amsterdam, there are less than 800,000, which i think is about the same as san francisco. i will also pass around a few sheets. the important thing is that amsterdam is one of the five major economic central's -- economic centers in europe, and we want to stay that way, and we are an attractive city for international business, like the american and asian companies that like to have business in amsterdam. it is a real nice place to stay. experts like to live in amsterdam, and is accessible from all parts of the world. it is also very important case of cycling. what irony said, 2.2 million and happens, but the last line may be the most important, about 120 kilometers per day traffic jams. that is qu7?) a lot. this distance is not more than 25k. we have a real problem. that is not good for business. for us, it is active transport, really important as a solution for being accessible. ok, does it work? yes. this is the city. at the red li
: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we star
of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be able to acknowledge others. i see police chief [speaker not understood] is with us. and as we get other names, we will announce those. so, let's give them all a round of applause, please. (applause) >> as i indicated, you have the program before you. we did one additional note on the program, is that the city administrator naomi kelly will be introducing the mayor lee. and due to scheduling conflict, supervisor london breed will probably be arriving later and will make her welcoming remarks towards the end of the program. following the invocation by reveren
francisco is the best city in america to host the super bowl sunday in 2013. but friends you know what still mother - i'm concerned that some folks are still not involved in this great city. i'm proud that working with the trades units and we have consistently meet and exceeding our goals of placing people on projects. thank you commissioner. last summer we provided more than 5 thousand summer jobs for young people in partnership with the united people in the bay. we also were involved in other events that will place the youth of this city in jobs. in fact, the first s f young people are graduating. in a disversus community not everyone wants to work in construction jobs. working with our workforce nonprofits like j v s and young community developers and we need to expand them. next week i'm looking forward to attending the cad any to see all the folks who are graduating. our industry contributes good paying jobs to our hospitals, universities and medical firms. and finally, to fully insure that our economic recovery reaches every people in the community we must join with our democrat leade
how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪@@to the fifth annual awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughou
they went and painted over it. and now it looks worse than the graffiti. i see it all over the city that a tag is painted over with brown paint, with whatever is available. and then it becomes a real problem because it's really hard to remove it then. so, i think that -- my thought about it, i know dpw doesn't have the financial resources, but realistically i think sidewalks even though they're kind of that nebulous gray area where technically they're owned by the property owner, but they really are public property. and i think that's something that dpw should somehow find the funding to take care of that property because private property owners are not going to hire somebody with a power washer to come out there and do it. i just know it. i mean, i see very, very few examples of that. >> larry. >> i would agree. but as always, it's an issue of funding. we do have approved product listses on our website. so, if you run into somebody, there are some there they can use and actually work relatively well. but the ultimately cities face this all the time. you have to make decisions about
events happening throughout the city. grab your valentine and get ready to have some fun. here are my topics for the week. this thursday, february 14th, bring your special someone or just your admiration for romantic music for a night of flamingo music. and other renowned musicians combine rowman i can music of i go far with footwork and song. dinner will be served throughout the performance so make your reservation early to ensure great view. okay. maybe valentine's day isn't your thing. well, have no fear because sf is here and there's over 300 events celebrating san francisco's craft fair legacies throughout the city. one event that i'm really looking forward to is the brewery blow out at speaks easy lauger. friday, february 15, enjoy 15 rare and limited beer on tap to live music and home brewing demonstration. and for complete beer week 2013 schedule check out official page. after the festivities come burn off all those calories in the park. free outdoor swing dance at golden gate park. get ready to swing when the streets of golden gate park will close to traffic and dancers take
across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets th
council prior to any endorsement by the city putting it up. the other factor we're looking at is that on-going community consultation into the project is going to have to be a priority and the city community recreation department have to sign off on any public consultation. so we're looking at it being an audit process before, during, during the pilot and it's only going to be run as a two-year pilot project. so we're running all of these analysis will happen before the project's initiated as well and then so that we don't have any trouble with them claiming after the fact if it has to be taken down, it's art, you can't destroy it now, any area we determine to be a free wall is going to be put on panels that are movable so we won't have any issues with that and we're going to be looking at ensuring there are guidelines posted and looking at what type of monitoring of the area can be determined, as well as who is going to be responsible for spillover so we're going to try to make the arts council, they are going to have to be responsible for maintaining the property as well as an area
serves as an example for cities across the country, whether they have a limited supply or not. and many utilities can identify with the struggles that come with maintaining underground assets to support a growing population. one of the most common issues that municipalities share is water loss. melosi: because it's not a catastrophic issue, we don't think much about it. but there is a 10%, 20%, 30% water loss or leakage in some systems. allbee: already treated water that you've invested money in, you're losing before you actually delivered it. narrator: so many utilities are employing the business strategy of asset management. it's a paradigm shift in the approach of attaining a sustainable water infrastructure. man: it's not construction of new pipelines. we are talking about maintaining, sustaining the infrastructure we have. you've got to know what you have, where it is, what condition it's in, and how long you can expect it to last. melosi: we have very little choice because we've invested in a system that cannot be readily changed. we don't leave a lot of flexibility to dig that al
building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million pe
our probation departments and working with police and other city departments san francisco in 2012 has responded to the challenges a of realignment and intergrating non-violent programs it sport non-violent lives. and just as he must continue to be a healthier city. less than one year our adults will receive health care thanks to president obama and nancycy pelosi. we have a long-standing healthy program and the new international law will extend the program to 3 b thousand san franciscans. and just as we must keep getting health care and pension reform define we must address the challenge of the unfunded liability area. we're beginning to make progress but we must development a more responsible approach to providing health care to our retired city employees >> and know that together our partners in labor will address this the san francisco way to son sense once in a while. and finally, we must rebuilt our st. louis hospital in the mission. they're the priors of critical health deliver as well as major employers. members of the board have taken a strong leadership role working with my
and having some proof at city effectiveness because somebody asked me in the other presentation, you've got all these programs, you've got clean up programs, how much are you spending on your program? we're spending a million dollars a year and everybody is saying, well, you know, how do you justify where you are putting those dollars? and i'm justifying putting those dollars because i can take my graffiti audit and say i know that this is where the graffiti is happeninging in the city. this is where the taggers are moving around and that information is then also shared with the edmonton police service and they are using that information in terms of going after which taggers so it's critical for a city to really look at not just anecdotally look at whether your graffiti is going up or down, it has to do with how effective you can make your programming. the graffiti audit program we have come up with, we looked everywhere to see if there was anybody doing any type of statistical analysis on graffiti vandalism in cities and we weren't able to find any so the model you will see is we worked w
distributed around the city. so, hopefully it fell in the hands of 130,000 people. and we are also distributing in all the libraries around the city. and while in speaking engagements, we talk about the civil grand jury. it is an excellent outreach item for us. we also have hal smith who is on the board [speaker not understood], and our current foreperson, mark [speaker not understood]. would you like to say anything about your jury service? >> well, i'm very grateful, one, to be selected. two, to have an incredible group of jurors to work with, representative of all aspects of san francisco communities and educational background. and it's been incredible to view what the city has to offer in a really intimate way. and we look forward to carrying on a rich tradition of following up with past reports, doing past juries proud, and we look forward to putting out some good reports. >> thank you. we also have, and i'm not going to call you out because i don't want anybody to [speaker not understood] we have several current jurors here and a number of former jurors here also. as kate sai
it has an opportunity to unveil many of our cultural aspirations in the city of san francisco. it has been 160 years, and we know our history well. my ascension to this office has been one of those things that people still consider me pretty special so much special not because of me but because of our community. this tab will have international status. gobs of people will want to have it, reflective of not only our history but if i go to washington dc tomorrow we will have an opportunity to talk with the rest of the mayors across the country is to how to celebrate new year's. this would be another example. want to congratulate again claudine and the whole team, postmaster general, is leadership is always been important. and the public service that she does not only in delivering the mail and postal service but reflective of the stamp and the u.s. postal service office that we get this opportunity to have a national platform on which our culture affinities can be displayed. happy new year. (chinese) thank you mayor lee. every year the united states postal service in washington
. as the city of san francisco has greatly improved the graffiti situation, i've noticed that there's more graffiti on concrete, on sidewalks, on curbs and also on trees, tree trunks. and tree trunks, graffiti on trees to me is the lowest form of graffiti that there is because it just -- it is so lacking in any consciousness about the environment and life and so forth. so, i'm wondering when i was in a graffiti advisory board, several of us tried to get some special attention paid to those things as well as glass etching. i don't know if glass etching has gotten worse or not, but particularly graffiti on concrete sidewalks and curbses and trees. i'm wondering if perhaps officer parerra [speaker not understood] can speak to that if any special efforts are made to address those. >> i'll speak to it. when we invoked the blight ordinance, we recently had it changed. we have now put that -- we were doing it as a department. we were doing the abatement for the sidewalks. sidewalks are actually private property. so, we have now changed that and put the property owner responsible for the graffiti
on google for that. i spent about 28 years as a police officer for the city of san bernardino, california, about 80 miles outside los angeles. among other things i'm recognized as an expert on graffiti in california superior court. without reading all this i want to let you know that i am well rounded, i was supervisor of the unit to be supervisor of a multi agency dealing with it to being executive director for the entire state, california graffiti association of california. so i have a fair amount of background. i first became involved in graffiti back in 1991 when i was told in the gang unit that i was going to be a two-week assignment to deal with these guys called taggers. i continued until i retired so it was a long two weeks. a lot of times cities don't understand how deep the issue goes. i have had my card handed out, this is my phone number. i have absolutely no problem with people calling me any time to discuss graffiti issues, graffiti cases, any of that stuff, i am always available. that's why i put my card out there. so first off, before we get into the graffiti part we
for their contributions to the city. and i think we have this year's winner epitomizes the kind of person that we should take the time to acknowledge and to go further into that i'd like to actually take a moment and invite now our supervisor district 8 malia cohen who would like to share her opening thoughts on this award. (applause) >> can i just tell you how good it feels to be up here, to look out to see all the people that make everything possible, that really makes san francisco wonderful? and i just have got to give a special shout out. you knew i grew up in the portola for those that don't know. [cheering and applauding] >> right there at the intersection of silly man and colby, my parents still live there. that's where it started for me. but tonight is a night that we have abopportunity * to up lift and support and say thank you to all the people that certainly provide me support and provide me the motivation to get up and come to work every single day. this is an opportunity to thank and praise the people that call me stop, that e-mail me, find me on facebook, send me a twitter and pick, fou
have attempted to manage this great city of ours for everybody. that is, i'm not shy about asking for help. and when it comes to the challenges we have in the african-american community, we need help. and i have been deliberately assembling a very important group of people who are going to help me get the job done. and you've seen some of these people already. they are malia cohen, london breed at the board. they have to face all the different politics. but i know they're going to be great partners with me because we've got the right objectives to happen. we want everybody included in the city. we have naomi kelly, harlan kelly, mohammed nuru, rhonda simmons heading upstreamly important departments. and i've got to say this. if we can't get the job done with these people in these important positions or some tremendous progress, i don't know where else to look because this is a great start. yes. (applause) >> but we also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie a
out doing theater at city college so they sign a waiver form to be volunteers. i don't know, does that answer your question? >> one question, now that i know about the legislative, i was wondering about this program when they start thinking about where the money should go. >> unfortunately, i think so yes. on my college campus it's highly revered. i'm a rock star with my students for this. >> as far as the city is concerned, too, because we take that money and we dump it into the city college and it gets to these guys and then it gets to the community. what i tend to do is when we go to the schools, it's a perfect -- it's a lot of good pr, the principals and whoever is there to write letters to say, hey, this is a great program, please continue and at the end of the session we always have a survey tool that i ask the teachers and administration to fill out. and then at the end of the year when we do the end of our run, i'll submit that packet to our city council and say, look, we have visited these many schools, this is the response that we got from teachers and parents, you kn
trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a moment. >> nancy did mention that we will announce the winners of the fabulous poster contest. i am the executive director of commission on the status of women. the mayor will be announcing not only the winners of the poster contest but also the winners of this year'
but was actually a development of some sort and then we struck gold here with the help of the city government and the mayor, mayor brown and especially with bulsa to which helen referred a remarkable alliance of community leaders who worked in an private partnership with ucsf to acquire the land to get a master plan and to get this thing going. so, once the opportunity was here, then, we knew what to do with it. first of all, since this site was rather removed from the then nerve center of the campus, we knew that in one fell swoop we would have to create a critical mass science, featuring some of our most creative and adventuresome scientists and second, we would have to create the opportunity to do new things and in new ways. and i think that it is generally agreed that we have succeeded at both. within a year of opening the first building, genentech was filled with a cohesive community with creative scientists who organized themselves in ways that would create and facility new alliances across disciplinary boundaries. and second, we created the opportunity to do new things in new ways. and
decided to keep wanting to volunteering and do it. we established a scholarship at city college for the horticultural department. and we have just gone gangbusters. we get good press and we get to see everybody's neighbor -- all our neighbors' gardens. because of the way san francisco s you get to be veuyer because usually you have to go through their garage or their house to see the gardens. and ruth gets known through the neighborhood because she's constantly peeking over fences and leaving fliers in people's mailboxes saying, do you want to be on the garden tour, and all this sort of thing. but anyway, so, we've -- just to show you how much the neighborhood has gotten to know each other, all the people in the portola, wave your hand. [cheering and applauding] >> and this is only a small representation. and six years ago i would say maybe a dozen of us knew each other, and now we know hundreds of people in our neighborhood. and we've become so desirable from a real estate standpoint, we have multiple offers on houses and they all go for over asking. (applause) >> so, if you wa
. >> the project all started from the brain child over here, noelexsavio of the city of san francisco code enforcement department. (applause). >> early 2007 gave me a call, he said, hey, i got this funding for a really cool project, can you help me out, i don't do theater. so we got together, we put together a script and we've been touring every since. we hope it's doing some good. we hope it's changing some lives. i could go on and on and on about this but i'm not. we'll have a little q and a session after this. can you hear me? i'm an actor, i don't need this. we'll answer questions about how it got going and what it's about. the way we start this out at the schools is i come out and introduce myself, introduce the guys a little bit, these are my students at sacramento city college then kick it off, hello, local celebrity, a guy from sacramento who does performances in poetry, he's an actor, he does rap music, all kinds of stuff, he doesn't juggle but he has a lot of talent and i'm sure he could. now we'll go to the spoken word with lsg >> wow, once you learn somet
thing with cycling. in the united states, many people, especially in big cities, are much more resistant to the idea, including individual motorists, not just businesses afraid of profit. i am wondering, i am not sure how much a european have met with people who are very resistant, thinking it is like socialism, people just want to take over the streets and will not be room for cars and we will go slower and lose jobs. have you been able to convince people? what kind of arguments have you had? >> two weeks ago, a new york, it was 400 years ago that new amsterdam was found at -- was founded. they convinced the general director of the new york port authority to put into action a bike accessibility plan, a bike plan for the more than 200,000 employees of the new york port authority. so they convinced these men that it would be a benefit to invest in bike accessibility. the thing is, i don't know, maybe you could put out an opportunity to meet them. we are mainly preaching for people who like our message, but i hardly meet people -- the opposition. i don't know, maybe there are some people w
that today is the start of the trial on market street, the fact that we are really moving our city's biking agenda forward. and i think with those of our friends from europe, we all want to take this to the next level and figure out what are the best ideas that we can adopt from the great cities around the world. we know that in recent years, i think san francisco with the help of our community advocates from the bike coalition and other advocates were really trying to bike strong and bike hard into the wind and i think finally the wind is at our back. we need the best ideas from around the world to move our great city forward. so welcome to our friends from europe. again, thank you for all of you here in san francisco that care passionately about this and i look forward to working with all of us to move this movement forward. [applause] >> thank you very much, supervisor. our next speaker was an elected member of the brussels parliament representing the green party. she was also minister of social affairs, health, and equal opportunities in the government before starting her political care
and an artist in the 1970's. she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go ou
the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should also hear them ask for our help, because i know as much as anybody else that our kids will inherit the good things that we do. they will also inherit the things that we fail to do. and i'm about making sure that we fail less in the things that we're obligated to do for our generations. that's why i'm investing in education. personally, and with all of my administration, i
. >> these are the spots you don't want to park. in the city there are a lot of spots like that. that's pretty common response -- my experience with driving. i was driving going hope. home i had to go 2 miles. it took 3 hours to drive 2 miles. it was my unwillingness to give up my car. i could have gotten out of my car and walked home. i'm driving i thought it would be easier if i had walked. on the freeway? this person out of his truck survived. he got out and waited for help. there are a lot of people who have certain skills will get to them. how about the bay bridge? if you have to drive after, drive slow. 5-10 miles per hour. look ahead to see if the roads are difficult to maneuver. even if you have a motorcycle it's hard to drive around this area. sometimes it's easy to walk than to drive off. the fifth, 11 people died, 6 were here. they were waiting for the family members to get off. it was by a masonry building with glass. have emergency supply kit. at least 3. one for home, work one for the car. emergency supply kit you want one for home you want for 5 days. our old standard was 3. after hurr
seconds. 45 minutes later, the city has widespread damage, fire, police and paramedics are overwhelmed by thousands of calls. nert volunteers are gathering in appropriate staging areas. your objective is to set up a command structure and prioritize the incident. what is the first incident you want to respond to and why? what is the second incident you would respond to, and why? you would continue this process until all the incidents have been addressed. and you have to always remember what's the model of the nert program? come on, everyone, let's go. do the most good for the most amount of people. those who pick priority 1, 35 people reported missing or injured. what's the goal of the nert program? let's repeat it again. do the most good for the most amount of people. so, thus, what's the second incident you would go to? 9 elderly people. this is what you have to deal with. once you dealt with people, then you would respond to other incidents. what is the mission of the fire department? save lives, protect property. life is much more important than property. all right, let's move on. s
on tunnel avenue if you are a city resident you take it down there and show them you are a city resident and they will take it. call us. say, i can't get down there i have, they might come out with 50 gallon drums if you have waste or oil they will come and pick it up. if you have gasoline you haven't used in a while they will come and pick it up. the main thing is safety. we don't want to end up like this guy. he didn't heed the warnings. for each one of these to carry out this guy, how many guys are backing them up? i figure 4 a piece. we don't send in a team unless we have the same amount of people and then some to back them up. to get you to gage what an incident is the guy with the big thumb. the rule of thumb is this. if you cover the incident with your thumb you are far enough away. does it look like he's got it covered with his thumb? you see the smoke going to the side. he's still too close. he's got to back up further even with the rule of thumb. we want you to view the rule of time, distance and shielding. what's time, don't stick around. distance. get far away. shielding mean
, as every city has. you certainly will not have any of those bankers wearing bowler hats and numberless. more to the point, london out is tremendously diverse. paris is becoming in admitting that it is more a diversity, and there's a little line for me quite hidden away the says i'm very much a parisian or i'm interested in parisian women, but not quite sure that i ever met a parisian woman. what do you mean by that? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of t
to stop making t-12 bulbs. >> it is scheduled for extinction. >> along the same lines, the city of san francisco is considering an ordinance to require the conversion from the old 212 to t-8 efficiency fixtures or higher. >> there are discussions. many of the large owners have gone to retrofits because there is a very good payback on it. the only commercial buildings that haven't done that are the smaller buildings where there is not as much money involved. >> so what other energy-efficient leading do we see these days? >> in both residential and commercial applications, you're seeing a trend toward compact fluorescent bulbs where instead of the conventional edison-based socket. >> the edison base, the screw type socket. >> the standard screw-in socket that everybody uses. >> all are edison, right. >> now you're seeing pictures that have four-pin contact fluorescent bulbs. these are even more efficient -- they're approximately as fingerprint as a t-8. so they get about five times as much energy efficiency as a conventional light bulb. this goes into a special socket. you have to buy th
types of buildings are in the city. we have wood, unreinforced masonry, you have high rise and you have tilt ups. what's the safest construction type to be? four stories or less. wood? yeah, wood framed building. why is wood the safest building to be in, 4 stories or less? it flexes, yeah, it's flexible. what's the danger here? chimney, yeah, fireplace. be aware of the fact that just because it's a wood building and the event caused some sort of compromise of the structure of the building and the building is still standing doesn't necessarily mean there's not a danger there. so what could you as nert's do to make that situation better or at least keep it the same so no one else gets hurt? keep it off, yeah. keep people away. perfect. take out some of that yellow tape that you have, that yellow caution tape, and string it around around keep people back. in this particular case, what could you do to make that situation better? turn off the gas. where would you turn the gas off at? at the street, okay. that's a good place to do it. but you always want to do it at the safest location. so if
part is approval. and approval is something that's done at the local level here at the city of san francisco. we typically approve a listed product. like this kupling. occasionally we have somebody come forward saying, look, i have the listing. we say, that's great. but we don't allow to you use it here in san francisco. either the local law doesn't allow that kind of product or that kind of material, or we don't think it's safe. and i could give you some examples of that but basically 99% of the time we approve a list of products which has been tested, listed, and then approved by david or me. basically it's on behalf of the director of the department of building inspection. is that a good example? >> that's it. >> and day have i spends a lot of his time look at listings. tell us what this s. >> this is a cupling for electric metallic tubing. it's quite a large one. but the neat thing about this one is that it has a waterproof seal. it does not leak. this is a new advance in the industry. previously the fittings leaked and caused problems and now they're coming out with problems t
himself all over our city. and, so, just through all that he's never changed his dedication. he doesn't take shortcuts, repaint and color match and do all public and private property in our city. so, just his dedication in our program has made a huge difference in our city. we appreciate it. (applause) [laughter] >> congratulations. (applause) >> lisa mc kenzie. >> okay. i'm accepting this award for mike yeager and bill mcdonnis, [speaker not understood]. i think all the cities that have volunteer programs it's usually a handful of volunteers that do a majority of the work. these guys are both retired and they have accomplished so much within their neighborhood. they live in one of the biggest neighborhood associations -- excuse me, homeowner associations in san antonio, about 5,000 houses. so, he wrote his little speech so i'm going to read his speech. he would like to thank the stop urban blight organization on our behalf for recognizing this and bill and i are truly do not do what we do for recognition, but is very gratifying when someone takes the time and effort to tell you
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